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Keeping Your Soul

Today’s reading: Deuteronomy 3-4; Mark 11:20-33

9 “Only take care, and keep your soul diligently, lest you forget the things that your eyes have seen, and lest they depart from your heart all the days of your life. Make them known to your children and your children’s children— Deuteronomy 4:9

25 And whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father also who is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses.” Mark 11:25

Moses, in his final instructions to the Israelites, reminded them of God’s great power and deliverance on their behalf, beginning in Egypt right up to the end of Moses’ life on the threshold of the Promised Land. He warned them to keep their souls diligently, not forgetting all that God had done for them. They were told to pass these lessons on to their children and grandchildren. This was no idle command because their faithfulness to the Lord would be tested soon and often.

In Jesus’ instructions to His disciples near the end of His earthly life and ministry, He told them to take care of resolving interpersonal conflicts, even interrupting their prayer to forgive, lest God not hear their requests for forgiveness.

Here are two ways God’s people in all ages need to keep their souls diligently. One, we need to remember God’s power which He has used for us for good every day in countless ways, but can be used against us for discipline when we forget Him and follow after other gods. Two, we need to beware of the danger of holding grudges against others for real or imagined offenses when we need God’s mercy and forgiveness continually no less than they.

Keep your soul diligently. Remember God’s power. Remember God’s mercy. Trust Him. Be merciful.

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#Biblereading #devotional #discipleship

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