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Why Jesus Came

Today’s reading: Mark 2:1-4:20

My selection: Mark 2:17

17 And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.”

My reflections:

In the world, we find three groups of people with relationship to Jesus Christ. Two of these groups never find salvation through Christ, unless there is a fundamental change in them. First, there are those tormented souls who believe that they are too evil to be saved. Second, there are those haughty souls who believe they are too good to need saving. They despise Jesus’ strong assertions. They feel no need for help. They are sure they have a secure place at God’s table.

There is a third goup, the ones who do come to Christ and find salvation. They know they are sick and sinful and, in themselves, hopeless. It is the sweetest music they have ever heard when He says He came for sinners. While on earth Jesus ate with these kind of people. He befriended them. They flocked to Him and held onto His teachings. These were the people Jesus came for. They were the focus of Jesus’ life and ministry: sinners who believed. They still are.

My challenge: In which of these three groups are you? Do you see yourself as too far gone even for Jesus to save? If so, you underestimate His power and love. Do you see yourself as good enough not to need a Savior? If so, you overestimate your holiness before a Perfect God who dwells in unapproachable light and will judge the secrets of men’s hearts. I hope you see yourself as a sick and needy person and Jesus as a mighty Savior who forgives the repentant, believing sinner. He came for people like that.  Trust Him for forgiveness, healing, hope, and eternal life.

Tomorrow’s reading: Mark 4:21-6:29

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© 2020 by John A. Carroll - website design by Michelle Gill

Portrait Photography by Tess Dryzmala